HOME SOLUTION RECIPES TO WASH OFF PESTICIDES & INSECTICIDES ON FRUITS & VEGETABLES

Consider these facts:

- Bacteria and fungus occur naturally on most crops. Even if there is no visible soil clinging to your non-organic or organic produce, bacteria can be present.
- Imagine how many hands touch the food before it gets to your mouth, plus bacteria from soil and dirt can accumulate during the shipping process: these can cause a buildup on the surface of any produce.
- Agriculture pesticides are not removable with water alone.

Everyone likes to save money, and since there’s no need to buy expensive produce wash when you can just as easily mix your own with common ingredients known to most cupboards, jump on board! This ensures better flavor, reduces risks of consuming contaminants, and saves money in the process – a plus on all counts. The combination of long-term health benefits and putting pennies in pockets will be doubly rewarding.

SO…NOW, WHAT IS YOUR EXCUSE OF NOT EATING PLANT-BASED FOODS? =)

Produce Wash Solution 1
- 20 drops grapefruit seed extract, available at health food stores
- 1 Tablespoon baking soda
- 1 cup white vinegar
- 1 cup water
- New spray bottle

Produce Wash Solution 2
- 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
- 1 Tablespoon white vinegar
- 1 cup water
- New spray bottle

Produce Wash Solution 3
- 1 cup water
- 1 cup white vinegar
- 1 Tablespoon baking soda
- 1/2 lemon
- New spray bottle

Spray produce. Let sit 5-10 minutes and rinse thoroughly to wash away residue.

NOTE: The baking soda and vinegar will foam when mixed together. Make sure you use a deep pitcher and pour slowly.

Vinegar is anti-bacterial and lemon is a natural astringent.

Source: naturalnews.com, drozfans.com

 

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8 Health Benefits of Asparagus

Health Benefits:

1. Feeds friendly bacteria: Asparagus is one of the few vegetables containing a carbohydrate called inulin. Inulin promotes the growth and activity of these friendly bacteria in the intestines making it difficult for unfriendly bacteria to grow.

2. Anti-carcinogen: Asparagus is the food highest in glutathione, an important anti-carcinogen according to the National Cancer Institute.

3. The root is used to treat urinary issues as well as kidney and bladder stones.

4. Help with a hangover: Researchers say amino acids and minerals in asparagus extract may ease hangovers and protect liver cells against the toxins in alcohol. “These results provide evidence of how the biological functions of asparagus can help alleviate alcohol hangover and protect liver cells,” said lead researcher B.Y. Kim, Institute of Medical Science and Jeju National University in South Korea.

5. Is used as a tonic in Ayurvedic medicine.

6. Excellent source of folacin which has been shown to help in the prevention of neural tube defects that cause paralysis and death in 2,500 babies each year.

7. Has many medicinal properties, according to the ancient Romans.

8. Easy Weight Loss: Like many vegetables, asparagus has very low sugar content, zero fat, a low glycemic index, smart carbs and lots of fiber.

 

 

Read Dr. Oz’s 99 Healthiest Foods — How Many Are In Your Shopping Cart?

Supermarket Staple #1: Tree Fruits (apples, pears)

Why It’s a Must Have: White fleshed fruits and veggies (such as apples and pears) have been shown to help reduce heart disease even more than their colored counterparts. “Apples are also rich in quercetin, a flavonoid with strong anti-inflammatory properties,” says Erin Palinski, a registered dietitian and author of the Belly Fat Diet for Dummies. “The pectin found in the skin and the anti-aging polyphenols in apples help reduce artery and cell damage, and their fiber has also been linked with reduction of LDL-cholesterol and body weight.” In fact, one Brazilian study published in the journal Nutrition found that women who ate three apples or three pears a day lost significantly more weight than those that ate the same amount of calories, but didn’t consume the fruits.

Budget Bonus: Shop for produce on a Tuesday or Wednesday, when it is more likely to have just arrived, instead of waiting until the weekend. Most markets receive deliveries during the week, and fruits and veggies that have just made it to the store means they be more likely to stay fresher longer (and get eaten, not wasted) at home. And if you can, buy local apples at your farmer’s market in the spring, summer, and fall to cut costs and improve their nutritional value, recommends Palinski. “Local fruits and vegetables are picked and sold immediately, helping them retain their nutrient level.”

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